2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog

Tri-Co Environmental Studies Minor With The Johanna Alderfer Harris Environmental Studies Program

Students may complete a minor in Environmental Studies as an adjunct to any major at Bryn Mawr, Haverford, or Swarthmore pending approval of the student’s coursework plan by the home department and the home-campus Environmental Studies director.

Affiliated Faculty at Bryn Mawr College:

Ellen Stroud, Growth and Structure of Cities, Environmental Studies Director*
Don Barber, Geology
Peter Briggs, English
Andrew Brook, Philosophy (on leave semester I)
Rick Davis, Anthropology
Victor Donnay, Mathematics
Jonas Goldsmith, Chemistry
Karen Greif, Biology
Carol Hager, Political Science (on leave semester II)*
Michael Rock, Economics
David Ross, Economics
Bethany Schneider, English
Michael Sears, Biology*

Affiliated Faculty at Haverford College:

Helen White, Chemistry, Environmental Studies Director*
Nikhil Anand, Anthropology*
Kim Benston, English*
Craig Borowiak, Political Science (on leave semesters I and II)
Steve Finley, English
Andrew Friedman, History
Jerry Gollub, Physics
Karl Johnson, Biology
Jason Lambacher, Political Science
Iruka Okeke, Biology
Rob Scarrow, Chemistry
Jonathan Wilson, Biology

Affiliated Faculty at Swarthmore College:

Peter Collings, Physics and Astronomy, Environmental Studies Director*
Elizabeth Bolton, English Literature
Timothy Burke, History
Erich Carr Everbach, Engineering
Alison Holliday, Chemistry
Eric Jensen, Physics and Astronomy
José-Luis Machado, Biology
Arthur McGarity, Engineering*
Rachel Merz, Biology
Carol Nackenoff, Political Science (on leave semesters I and II)
Hans Oberdiek, Philosophy
Colin Purrington, Biology (on leave semesters I and II)
Christine Schuetze, Sociology and Anthropology*
Richard Valelly, Political Science
Mark Wallace, Religion (on leave semester I)

*- member of tri-college Environmental Studies Steering Committee

The Johanna Alderfer Harris Environmental Studies Program

The Johanna Alderfer Harris Environmental Studies Program
at Bryn Mawr College is the place for students and faculty to come together to explore academic interests in the environment. The program sponsors speakers, special events, and field trips, and offers support for student work during the summer, in the form of the college’s competitive Green Grants. In addition, beginning in 2011-12, The Harris Environmental Studies Program is the Bryn Mawr campus home for the new Tri-College Environmental Studies Minor. The program benefits from two endowed chairs in Environmental Studies, The Johanna Alderfer Harris and William H. Harris, M.D. Chair in Environmental Studies, currently held by Growth and Structure of Cities Associate Professor Ellen Stroud, and the Harold Alderfer Chair in Environmental Studies, currently held by Geology Associate Professor Donald Barber.

The Tri-Co Environmental Studies Minor

Beginning with the 2011-12 academic year, Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges are offering a new a Tri-College Environmental Studies Interdisciplinary Minor, involving departments and faculty from the natural sciences, the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on all three campuses. The Tri-College Environmental Studies Minor aims to bring students and faculty together to explore interactions among earth systems, human societies, and local and global environments.

The Tri-Co ES Minor aims to cultivate in students the capacity to identify and confront key environmental issues through a blend of multiple disciplines, encompassing historical, cultural, economic, political, scientific, and ethical modes of inquiry. Acknowledging the reciprocal dimensions of materiality and culture in the historical (de)formation of "the" environment, this program is broadly framed by a series of interlocking dialogues: between the "natural" and the "built"; between the local and the global; and between the human and the nonhuman.

The minor consists of six courses, including an introductory course and capstone course, and the courses may be completed at any of the three campuses (or any combination thereof). To declare the minor, students should contact the Environmental Studies director at their home campus.

Minor Requirements

The Environmental Studies Interdisciplinary Minor consists of six courses, as follows:

  1. A required introductory course to be taken prior to the senior year. This may be ENVS 101 at Bryn Mawr or Haverford or the parallel course at Swarthmore College (ENVS 001). Any one of these courses will satisfy the requirement, and students may take no more than one such course for credit toward the minor.
  2. Four elective course credits from approved lists of core and cognate courses, including two credits in each of the following two categories (A and B). No more than one cognate course credit may be used for each category (see course list below for more information about core and cognate courses).
    1. Environmental Science and Engineering: courses that build understanding and knowledge of scientific methods and theories, and that explore how these can be applied in identifying and addressing environmental challenges. At least one of the courses in this category must have a laboratory component.
    2. Environmental and Society: courses that build understanding and knowledge of social and political structures as well as ethical considerations, and how these inform our individual and collective responses to environmental challenges.
  3. A senior seminar with culminating work that reflects tangible research design and inquiry, but which might materialize in any number of project forms. Bryn Mawr College's ENVS 397 (Environmental Studies Senior Seminar, co-taught by faculty members from Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges in 2011-2012) and Swarthmore College's ENVS 091 (Environmental Studies Capstone Seminar) satisfy the requirement, and plans are for ENVS 397 to be taught at Haverford College starting in 2012-2013.

Core Courses

ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies

(at Bryn Mawr)
E. Stroud, M. Sears
(Fall 2011)

ENVS 101 Case Studies in Environmental Issues

(at Haverford)
N. Anand, H. White
(Fall 2011)

ENVS 001 Introduction to Environmental Studies

(at Swarthmore)
D. Barber, M. Wallace
(Spring 2012)

ENVS 397: Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies

(at Bryn Mawr)
C. Hager, J. Wilson
(Fall 2011)

ENVS 091 Environmental Studies Capstone Seminar

(at Swarthmore)
(Spring 2012)

Elective Courses

The ES Minor Steering Committee determines the list of courses approved to meet the minor requirements and classifies the courses in two categories: core and cognate courses.

  • Core courses are those within the Tri-College community that are centrally organized around environmental themes and devote at least 50% of the class time to studying environmental issues.
  • Cognate courses are those that have less focus on the environment compared to core courses, but nevertheless build understanding and knowledge of areas of inquiry that are highly valuable to the study and solution of environmental problems. While the focus on the environment typically occupies less than half of the class time in cognate courses, there is some mention of how the main focus of the course can inform understanding of environmental issues.

The approved lists of electives are subject to revision and the list published on the website immediately prior to each semester will govern which courses may be used to satisfy the elective requirements. The current approved list is as follows.

Approved List of Electives

An asterisk (*) indicates cognate course; no more than one credit of these may be used for each category. (L) indicates laboratory course; one of the courses in category A must be a laboratory course.

Category A) Environmental Science and Engineering

Bryn Mawr

BIOL 210 Biology and Public Policy
BIOL 220 (L) Ecology
BIOL 225 * Biology of Plants
BIOL 250 * Computational Methods
BIOL 309 (L) Biological Oceanography
BIOL 320 (L) Evolutionary Ecology
GEOL 101 (L) How the Earth Works
GEOL 103 (L) Earth Systems and the Environment
GEOL 130 Life in Earth's Future Climate
GEOL 206 * Resources
GEOL 209 Natural Hazards
GEOL 230 * The Science of Soils
GEOL 255 Problem Solving in the Environmental Sciences
GEOL 302 Low Temperature Geochemistry
GEOL 314 Marine Geology
GEOL 328 * Geographic Information Systems
MATH 210 * Differential Equations w/ Apps (Environmental Problems)

Haverford

BIOL 123 * Perspectives in Biology: Scientific Literacy (half-credit)
BIOL 124 * Perspectives in Biology: Tropical Infectious Disease (half-credit)
BIOL 310 * Molecular Microbiology (half-credit)
BIOL 314 * Photosynthesis (half-credit)
CHEM 112 *(L) Chemical Dynamics
CHEM 358 Topics in Environmental Chemistry
PHYS 111b Energy Options and Science Policy

Swarthmore

BIOL 016 *(L) Microbiology
BIOL 017 *(L) Microbial Pathogenesis and Immune Response
BIOL 025 *(L) Plant Biology
BIOL 026 *(L) Invertebrate Zoology
BIOL 034 *(L) Evolution
BIOL 036 (L) Ecology
BIOL 039 (L) Marine Biology
BIOL 115E * Plant Molecular Genetics - Biotechnology
BIOL 116 * Microbial Processes and Biotechnology
BIOL 130 * Behavioral Ecology
BIOL 137 Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function
CHEM 001 *(L) Chemistry in the Human Environment
CHEM 043 *(L) Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 103 Topics in Environmental Chemistry
ENGR 003 *(L) Problems in Technology
ENGR 004A (L) Environmental Protection
ENGR 004B *(L) Swarthmore and the Biosphere
ENGR 035 *(L) Solar Energy Systems
ENGR 057 * Operations Research
ENGR 063 Water Quality and Pollution Control
ENGR 066 Environmental Systems
MATH 056 * Modeling
PHYS 024 (L) The Earth and Its Climate

Category B) Environment & Society

Bryn Mawr

ANTH 203 Human Ecology
ANTH 210 * Medical Anthropology
ANTH 237 Environmental Health
ANTH 263 *Anthropology and Architecture
ARCH 245 The Archaeology of Water
CITY 175 Environment and Society: History, Place, and Problems
CITY 2xx (number to be designated) Building Green
CITY 278 American Environmental History
CITY 325 Environmental History of the Body
CITY 345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
CITY 360 Brazil: City, Nature, Identity
CITY 377 Global Architecture of Oil
EAST 352 China's Environment: History, Policy, and Rights
EAST 362 Environment in Contemporary East Asia
ECON 225 * Economics of Development
ECON 234 Environmental Economics
ECON 242: Economics of Local Environmental Programs
ENGL 204 * Literatures of American Expansion
ENGL 268 Native Soil: Indian Land & American Lit 1588-1840
ENGL 275 Food Revolutions
ENGL 2xx (number to be designated) Food For Thought
HIST 212 * Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750
HIST 237 Urbanization in Africa
PHIL 240 Environmental Ethics
POLS 222 Intro to Environmental Issues
POLS 278 * Oil, Politics, Society and Economy
POLS 310 * Comparative Public Policy
POLS 321 * Technology and Politics
POLS 339 * The Policymaking Process
POLS 354 * Comparative Social Movements
SOCL 165 Problems in the Natural and Built Environment
SOCL 247 Environmental Social Problems
SOCL 316 * Science, Culture, and Society

Haverford

ANTH 252 * State and Development in South Asia
ANTH 263 * Anthropology of Space: Housing and Society
ANTH 281 Nature/Culture: Introduction to Environmental Anthropology
ENGL 217 * Humanimality
ENGL 257 * British Topographies
ENGL 356 Studies in American Environment and Place
HIST 119 * International History of the United States
HIST 253 History of the US Built Environment
POLS 261 * Global Civil Society
POLS 260 Environmental Political Theory (temporary course, 2011/2012)
POLS 360 Global Environmental Politics (temporary course, 2011/2012)

Swarthmore

ECON 076 Environmental Economics
EDUC 065 Environmental Education
ENGL 070G Writing Nature
HIST 089 Environmental History of Africa
LING 120 Anthropological Linguistics: Endangered Languages
LITR 022 * Food Revolutions: History, Politics, Culture
POLS 043 Environmental Policy and Politics
POLS 048 * The Politics of Population
RELG 022 Religion and Ecology
SOAN 006 * FYS: Forest of the Symbols
SOAN 023C Anthropological Perspectives on Conservation

The following are descriptions of Bryn Mawr courses.

ANTH B203 Human Ecology

The relationship of humans with their environment; culture as an adaptive mechanism and a dynamic component in ecological systems. Human ecological perspectives are compared with other theoretical orientations in anthropology. Prerequisites: ANTH 101, 102, or permission of instructor.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Davis,R.

ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology

This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B209
1.0 units
Pashigian,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ANTH B237 Environmental Health

This course introduces principles and methods in environmental anthropology and public health used to analyze global environmental health problems globally and develop health and disease control programs. Topics covered include risk; health and environment; food production and consumption; human health and agriculture; meat and poultry production; and culture, urbanization, and disease. Prerequisite: ANTH 102; permission of instructor.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Pashigian,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ARCH B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions

This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B104
1.0 units
Magee,P., Teaching Assistant,T.

ARCH B245 The Archaeology of Water

This course examines the distribution of water throughout the Middle East and Mediterranean and the archaeology of water exploitation and management over the last 12,000 years. Recent anthropological models that challenge the concept of "hydraulic civilization" are emphasized as are contemporary attempts to revive traditional and ancient technologies to preserve and better manage modern water resources.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Magee,P.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ARCH B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS

An introduction to analysis of geospatial data, theory, and the practice of geospatial reasoning. As part of this introduction students will gain experience in using one or more GIS software packages and be introduced to data gathering in the field by remote sensing. Each student is expected to undertake an independent project that uses the approaches and tools presented.
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS BIOL-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS GEOL-B328
1.0 units
Consiglio,D., Fitz-Patrick,D., Reese,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

BIOL B210 Biology and Public Policy

A lecture/discussion course on major issues and advances in biology and their implications for public policy decisions. Topics discussed include reproductive technologies, genetic screening and gene therapy, environmental health hazards, and euthanasia and organ transplantation. Readings include scientific articles, public policy and ethical considerations, and lay publications. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Division II: Natural Science
1.0 units
Greif,K.

BIOL B220 Ecology

A study of the interactions between organisms and their environments. The scientific underpinnings of current environmental issues, with regard to human impacts, are also discussed. Students become familiar with ecological principles and with the methods ecologists use to address tricky ecological issues. Students apply these principles through the design and implementation of experiments both in the laboratory and the field. Lecture three hours a week, laboratory/field investigation three hours a week. There will be optional field trips throughout the semester. Prerequisite: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or GEOL 103.
Division II with Lab
Scientific Investigation (SI)
1.0 units
Sears,M., Williams,N.
Not offered in 2011-12.

BIOL B225 Biology of Plants

In-depth examination of the structures and processes underlying survival, growth, reproduction, competition and diversity in plants. Three hours of lecture a week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113.
Division II and Quantitative Skills
1.0 units
Franklin,W., Williams,N.
Not offered in 2011-12.

BIOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences

A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially-explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
Division II and Quantitative Skills
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Quantitative Methods (QM)
CROSS-LISTED AS CMSC-B250
CROSS-LISTED AS GEOL-B250
1.0 units
Sears,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

BIOL B309 Biological Oceanography

A comprehensive examination of the principal ecosystems of the world's oceans, emphasizing the biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to the distribution of marine organisms. A variety of marine ecosystems are examined, including rocky intertidal, and hydrocarbon seeps, with an emphasis on the distinctive characteristics of each system and the assemblage of organisms associated with each system. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. One required three-day field trip, for which an extra fee is collected, and other occasional field trips as allowed for by scheduling. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 and one 200-level science course, or permission of instructor.
1.0 units
Gardiner,S.

BIOL B320 Evolutionary Ecology

This course will examine how phenotypic variation in organisms is optimized and constrained by ecological and evolutionary factors. We will cover concepts and case studies in life history evolution, behavioral ecology, and population ecology with an emphasis on both mathematical and experimental approaches. Recommended Prerequisites: BIOL B111-B114 or BIOL B220
Quantitative Skills
1.0 units
Sears,M.

BIOL B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS

An introduction to analysis of geospatial data, theory, and the practice of geospatial reasoning. As part of this introduction students will gain experience in using one or more GIS software packages and be introduced to data gathering in the field by remote sensing. Each student is expected to undertake an independent project that uses the approaches and tools presented.
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS GEOL-B328
1.0 units
Consiglio,D., Fitz-Patrick,D., Reese,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B103 Earth System Science and the Environment

This integrated approach to studying the Earth focuses on interactions among geology, oceanography, and biology. Also discussed are the consequences of population growth, industrial development, and human land use. Two lectures and one afternoon of laboratory or fieldwork per week. A required two-day (Fri.-Sat.) field trip is taken in April.
Division II with Lab
CROSS-LISTED AS GEOL-B103
1.0 units
Elkins,L., Barber,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions

From Egypt to India This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B104
1.0 units
Magee,P.

CITY B175 Environment and Society: History, Place, and Problems

Introduces the ideas, themes, and methodologies of the interdisciplinary field of environmental studies beginning with definitions: what is nature? What is environment? And how do people and their settlements fit into each? The course then moves to distinct disciplinary approaches in which scholarship can and does (and does not) inform our perceptions of the environment. Assignments introduce methodologies of environmental studies, requiring reading landscapes, working with census data and government reports, critically interpreting scientific data, and analyzing work of experts.
Division I: Social Science
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
CROSS-LISTED AS SOCL-B175
1.0 units
Stroud,E., Simpson,R.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B204 Economics of Local Environmental Programs

Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS ECON-B242
1.0 units
Ross,D.

CITY B210 Natural Hazards

A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week, with one day-long field trip. Prerequisite: one semester of college science or permission of instructor.
Division II and Quantitative Skills
CROSS-LISTED AS GEOL-B209
1.0 units
Weil,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B222 Introduction to Environmental Issues

An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in solving global environmental problems such as climate change.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B222
1.0 units
Hager,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B237 Urbanization in Africa

The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of preindustrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS HIST-B237
1.0 units
Ngalamulume,K.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B278 American Environmental History

This course explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, development of ideas about nature and the history of environmental activism. Students will study definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history while investigating interactions between Americans and their physical worlds.
Division I: Social Science
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
CROSS-LISTED AS HIST-B278
1.0 units
Stroud,E.

CITY B321 Technology and Politics

An analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological development and democratic governance. Discussion of theoretical approaches is supplemented by case studies of particular issues, such as electoral politics, warfare and terrorism, social networking and citizen mobilization, climate change, agriculture and food safety.
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B321
1.0 units
Hager,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS

An introduction to analysis of geospatial data, theory, and the practice of geospatial reasoning. As part of this introduction students will gain experience in using one or more GIS software packages and be introduced to data gathering in the field by remote sensing. Each student is expected to undertake an independent project that uses the approaches and tools presented.
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS BIOL-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS GEOL-B328
1.0 units
Consiglio,D., Fitz-Patrick,D., Reese,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B329 Advanced Topics in Urban Environmental Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Current topic description: In this course we will be exploring the place of human bodies in U.S. Environmental History. We will be looking at the ways in which people are quite literally a part of nature, examining how their physical selves shape and are shaped by their place in the natural world. Counts toward the Environmental Studies minor.1.0 units
Stroud,E.

CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society

This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS SOCL-B346
1.0 units
Simpson,R., Hayes-Conroy,A., Stroud,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B360 Topics in Urban Culture and Society

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Current topic description: Over two millennia, Barcelona has been capital, subordinate, battleground and arena of visionaries. A center for Catalan culture, a partner-adversary in Spain, an edge to Europe and a node for global ties of trade, image and immigration, Barcelona embodies many questions of the modern global city. Through architecture, urbanism, literature, art, ecology and social history, we will explore multiple voices and visions through which Barcelonins and critics re-imagine the city itself.
Division I or Division III
CROSS-LISTED AS ANTH-B359
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B359
CROSS-LISTED AS SOCL-B360
1.0 units
McDonogh,G.

CMSC B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences

A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially-explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
Division II and Quantitative Skills
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Quantitative Methods (QM)
CROSS-LISTED AS BIOL-B250
CROSS-LISTED AS GEOL-B250
1.0 units
Sears,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

EAST B352 China's Environment

This seminar explores China's environmental issues from a historical perspective. It begins by considering a range of analytical approaches , and then explores three general periods in China's environmental changes, imperial times, Mao's socialist experiments during the first thirty years of the People's Republic, and the post-Mao reforms. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS HIST-B352
1.0 units
Jiang,Y.

EAST B362 Environment in Contemporary East Asia: China and Japan

This seminar explores environmental issues in contemporary East Asia from a historical perspective. It will explore the common and different environmental problems in Japan and China, and explain and interpret their causal factors and solving measures in cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, international cooperation and changing perceptions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.
Division I or Division III
1.0 units
Jiang,Y.
Not offered in 2011-12.

EAST B225 Economic Development

Examination of the issues related to and the policies designed to promote economic development in the developing economics of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Focus is on why some growth paths are more equitable, poverty reducing, and environmentally sustainable than others. Includes consideration of the impact of international trade and investment policy, macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, monetary and fiscal policy) and sector policies (industry, agriculture, education, population, and environment) on development outcomes in a wide range of political and institutional contexts. Prerequisite: ECON B105, or H101 and H102.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY B225
1.0 units
Rock,M.

ECON B234 Environmental Economics

Introduction to the use of economic analysis explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them. Topics may include air and water pollution; the economic theory of externalities, public goods and the depletion of resources; cost-benefit analysis; valuing non-market benefits and costs; economic justice; and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON B105, or H101 and H102.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B234
1.0 units
Rock,M.

ECON B242 Economics of Local Environmental Programs

Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basis services. Prerequisite: ECON 105
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B204
1.0 units
Ross,D.

ENGL B204 Literatures of American Expansion

This course will explore the relationship between U.S. narratives that understand national expansion as "manifest destiny" and narratives that understand the same phenomenon as imperial conquest. We will ask why the ingredients of such fictions—dangerous savages, empty landscapes, easy money, and lawless violence—often combine to make the master narrative of "America," and we will explore how and where that master narrative breaks down. Critical readings will engage discourses of nation, empire, violence, race, and sexuality. Texts will include novels, travel narratives, autobiographies, legal documents, and cultural ephemera.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Schneider,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B268 Native Soil and American Literature:1492-1900

This course will consider the literature of contact and conflict between English-speaking whites and Native Americans between the years 1492 and 1920. We will focus on how these cultures understood the meaning and uses of land, and the effects of these literatures of encounter upon American land and ecology and vice-versa. Texts will include works by Native, European- and African-American writers, and may include texts by Christopher Columbus, John Smith, William Bradford, Handsome Lake, Samson Occom, Lydia Maria Child, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, John Rollin Ridge, Mark Twain, Mourning Dove, Ella Deloria and Willa Cather.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Schneider,B.

ENGL B275 Food Revolutions: History, Politics, Culture

This course traces an arc from the industrial revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries through to the present day food crisis. We will explore the cultural, political, philosophical, ethical and ecological histories of what and how we eat, and look towards sustainable, biodiverse and local agriculture.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Werlen,H., Thomas,K.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENVS B101 Introduction to Environmental Studies

This interdisciplinary introduction to Environmental Studies Minor examines the ideas, themes and methodologies of humanists, social scientists, and natural scientists in order to understand what they have to offer each other in the study of the environment, and how their inquiries can be strengthened when working in concert.
1.0 units
Stroud,E., Sears,M.

ENVS B397 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies

This capstone Environmental Studies course is designed to allow Environmental Studies seniors to actively engage in environmental problem solving by bringing the perspectives and skills gained from their majors and applying them to collaborative interdisciplinary projects. Prerequisite: Open only to Environmental Studies students who have completed all introductory work for the minor.
1.0 units
Hager,C.

GEOL B103 Earth Systems and the Environment

This integrated approach to studying the Earth focuses on interactions among geology, oceanography, and biology. Also discussed are the consequences of population growth, industrial development, and human land use. Two lectures and one afternoon of laboratory or fieldwork per week. A required two-day (Fri.-Sat.) field trip is taken in April.
Division II with Lab
Scientific Investigation (SI)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B103
1.0 units
Marenco,K., Barber,D., Elkins,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GEOL B206 Resources

An examination of issues concerning the supply of energy and raw materials required by humanity. This includes an investigation of the geological framework that determines resource availability, and of the social, economic, and political considerations related to energy production and resource development. Two 90-minute lectures a week. Prerequisite: one year of college science
Division II: Natural Science
1.0 units
Barber,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GEOL B209 Natural Hazards

A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week, with one day-long field trip. Prerequisite: one semester of college science or permission of instructor.
Division II and Quantitative Skills
Quantitative Methods (QM)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B210
1.0 units
Elkins,L.

GEOL B230 The Science of Soils

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing the physical properties, nutrient availability, and plant growth and production within soils. How to classify soils and to assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate will be covered. Prerequisite: at least one introductory course in Geology, Biology or Chemistry.
Division II: Natural Science
1.0 units
Oze,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GEOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences

A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially-explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
Division II and Quantitative Skills
CROSS-LISTED AS BIOL-B250
CROSS-LISTED AS CMSC-B250
1.0 units
Sears,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GEOL B302 Low-Temperature Geochemistry

The geochemistry of Earth surface processes. Emphasis is on the chemistry of surface waters, atmosphere-water environmental chemistry, chemical evolution of natural waters, and pollution issues. Fundamental princi¼ples are applied to natural systems with particular focus on environmental chemistry. One required field trip on a weekend. Prerequisites: CHEM 103, 104 and GEOL 202 or two 200-level chemistry courses, or permission of instructor.
1.0 units
Cull,S.

GEOL B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS

An introduction to analysis of geospatial data, theory, and the practice of geospatial reasoning. As part of this introduction students will gain experience in using one or more GIS software packages and be introduced to data gathering in the field by remote sensing. Each student is expected to undertake an independent project that uses the approaches and tools presented.
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B328
CROSS-LISTED AS BIOL-B328
1.0 units
Consiglio,D., Fitz-Patrick,D., Reese,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HIST B212 Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750

In the early modern period, conquistadors, missionaries, travelers, pirates, and natural historians wrote interesting texts in which they tried to integrate the New World into their existing frameworks of knowledge. This intellectual endeavor was an adjunct to the physical conquest of American space, and provides a framework though which we will explore the processes of imperial competition, state formation, and indigenous and African resistance to colonialism.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
1.0 units
Gallup-Diaz,I.

HIST B237 Urbanization in Africa

The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of preindustrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.
Division I: Social Science
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B237
1.0 units
Ngalamulume,K.

HIST B278 American Environmental History

This course explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, development of ideas about nature and the history of environmental activism. Students will study definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history while investigating interactions between Americans and their physical worlds.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B278
1.0 units
Stroud,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HIST B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society

This course will examine the meaning of "nature" and "environment" and how we understand our own relationship to it. We explore the social factors that shape how people define nature as variously savage or bountiful, a site of danger or entertainment, toxic or unspoiled, a force that controls human fates or a resource for humans to manipulate.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B345
1.0 units
Hayes-Conroy,A., Stroud,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HIST B352 China's Environment

This seminar explores China's environmental issues from a historical perspective. It begins by considering a range of analytical approaches , and then explores three general periods in China's environmental changes, imperial times, Mao's socialist experiments during the first thirty years of the People's Republic, and the post-Mao reforms. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS EAST-B352
1.0 units
Jiang,Y.

PHIL B240 Environmental Ethics

This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B240
1.0 units
Brook,A.

POLS B222 Introduction to Environmental Issues: Policy Making in Comparative Perspective

An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in solving global environmental problems such as climate change.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B222
1.0 units
Hager,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B240 Environmental Ethics

This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B240
1.0 units
Brook,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B278 Oil, Politics, Society, and Economy

Examines the role oil has played in transforming societies, in shaping national politics, and in the distribution of wealth within and between nations. Rentier states and authoritarianism, the historical relationships between oil companies and states, monopolies, boycotts, sanctions and demands for succession, and issues of social justice mark the political economy of oil.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Harrold,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy

A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers.
1.0 units
Hager,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B321 Technology and Politics

An analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological development and democratic governance. Discussion of theoretical approaches is supplemented by case studies of particular issues, such as electoral politics, warfare and terrorism, social networking and citizen mobilization, climate change, agriculture and food safety.
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B321
1.0 units
Hager,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements

A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and "legitimate" and "illegitimate" participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization, and collaborative policymaking institutions.
CROSS-LISTED AS SOCL-B354
1.0 units
Hager,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B165 Problems in the Natural and Built Environment

This course situates the development of sociology as responding to major social problems in the natural and built environment. It demonstrates why the key theoretical developments and empirical findings of sociology are crucial in understanding how these problems develop, persist and are addressed or fail to be addressed.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Wright,N.

SOCL B175 Environment and Society

Introduces the ideas, themes, and methodologies of the interdisciplinary field of environmental studies beginning with definitions: what is nature? What is environment? And how do people and their settlements fit into each? The course then moves to distinct disciplinary approaches in which scholarship can and does (and does not) inform our perceptions of the environment. Assignments introduce methodologies of environmental studies, requiring reading landscapes, working with census data and government reports, critically interpreting scientific data, and analyzing work of experts.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B175
1.0 units
Stroud,E., Simpson,R.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B247 Environmental Social Problems

This course examines environmental social problems from a constructionist perspective. We will examine how environmental problems become public problems that receive attention, money and widespread concern.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Simpson,R.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B316 Science, Culture and Society

Science is a powerful institution in American life, with extensive political and personal consequences. Through case studies and cross-disciplinary readings, this course challenges students to examine the social forces that influence how science is produced and used in public (and private) debates. Prerequisite: one course in Sociology, or the consent of the instructor.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Simpson,R.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B346 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society

This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B345
1.0 units
Simpson,R.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B354 Comparative Social Movements

CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B354
1.0 units
Hager,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B360 Topics in Urban Culture and Society

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B360
CROSS-LISTED AS ANTH-B359
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B359
1.0 units
McDonogh,G., Hayes-Conroy,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.