2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog

Italian

Students may complete a major or minor in Italian.

Faculty

Francesco Caruso, Instructor
Dennis McAuliffe, Visiting Associate Professor
Giuliana Perco, Lecturer
Roberta Ricci, Associate Professor and Chair
Gabriella Troncelliti, Instructional Assistant

Based on an interdisciplinary approach that views culture as a global phenomenon, the aims of the major in Italian are to acquire a knowledge of Italian language and literature and an understanding of Italian culture, including cinema, art, journalism, pop culture, and music. The Department of Italian also cooperates with the Departments of French and Spanish in the Romance Languages major and with the other foreign languages in the TRICO for a major in Comparative Literature. The Italian Department cooperates also with the Center for International Studies (CIS).

College Foreign Language Requirement

Before the start of the senior year, each student must complete, with a grade of 2.0 or higher, two units of foreign language. Students may fulfill the requirement by completing two sequential semester-long courses in one language, either at the elementary level or, depending on the result of their language placement test, at the intermediate level. A student who is prepared for advanced work may complete the requirement instead with two advanced free-standing semester-long courses in the foreign language(s) in which she is proficient. Non-native speakers of English may choose to satisfy all or part of this requirement by coursework in English literature.

Major Requirements

Major requirements in Italian are 10 courses: ITAL 101, 102 and eight additional units, at least three of which are to be chosen from the offerings on the 300 level, and no more than one from an allied field. All students must take a course on Dante (301), one on the Italian Renaissance (303 or 304) and 307, and two on modern Italian literature. Where courses in translation are offered, students may, with the approval of the department, obtain major credit provided they read the texts in Italian, submit written work in Italian and, when the instructor finds it necessary, meet with the instructor for additional discussion in Italian. Courses allied to the Italian major include, with departmental approval, all courses for major credit in ancient and modern languages and related courses in archaeology, art history, history, music, philosophy, and political science. Each student’s program is planned in consultation with the department.

Students who begin their work in Italian at the 200 level will be exempted from ITAL 101 and 102.

Major with Honors

Students may apply to complete the major with honors. The honors component requires the completion of a year-long thesis advised by a faculty member in the department.Students enroll in the senior year in ITAL 398 and ITAL 399. Application to it requires a GPA in the major of 3.7 or higher, as well as a written statement, to be submitted by 1 April of the junior year, outlining the proposed project (see further below) and indicating the faculty member who has agreed to serve as advisor. The full departmental faculty vets the proposals.

Thesis

Students will write and research a 40-50 page thesis that aims to be an original contribution to Italian scholarship. As such, it must use primary evidence and also engage with the relevant secondary literature. By the end of the fall semester, students must have completed twenty pages in draft. In April they will give an oral presentation of their work of approximately forty minutes to faculty and interested students. The final draft is due on or around 20 April of the senior year and will be graded by two faculty members (one of whom is the advisor). The grade assigned is the major component of the spring semester grade. Proposals for the thesis should describe the questions being asked in the research, and how answers to them will contribute to scholarship. They must include a discussion of the primary sources on which the research will rest, as well as a preliminary bibliography of relevant secondary studies. They also must include a rough timetable indicating in what stages the work will be completed. It is expected that before submitting their proposals students will have conferred with a faculty member who has agreed to serve as advisor.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor in Italian are ITAL 101, 102 and four additional units including two at the 200 level and two at the 300 level. With departmental approval, students who begin their work in Italian at the 200 level will be exempted from ITAL 101 and 102. For courses in translation, the same conditions for majors in Italian apply.

Study Abroad

Italian majors are encouraged to study in Italy during the junior year in a program approved by the College or in approved summer programs in Italy or in the United States.

COURSES

ITAL B001 Elementary Italian

The course is for students with no previous knowledge of Italian. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language—phonological, grammatical, syntactical—with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition.
Requirement(s): Language Level 1
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Troncelliti,G., Perco,G.
(Fall 2012)

ITAL B002 Elementary Italian II

This course is the continuation of ITAL B001 and is intended for students who have started studying Italian the semester before. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language—phonological, grammatical, syntactical—with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition. Prerequisite: ITAL B001 or placement.
Requirement(s): Language Level 1
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Perco,G.
(Spring 2013)

ITAL B101 Intermediate Italian

This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read a novel, as well as newspaper and magazine articles to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and discuss internet materials.
Requirement(s): Language Level 2
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ricci,R.
(Fall 2012)

ITAL B102 Intermediate Italian

This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read a novel, as well as newspaper and magazine articles to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and discuss internet materials.
Requirement(s): Language Level 2
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Perco,G.
(Spring 2013)

ITAL B200 Pathways to Proficiency

This course is intended for students who have already completed the elementary-intermediate sequence and who are interested in pursuing the study of Italian. The aim of the course is to improve students’ proficiency in the Italian language, so that they will be able to take more advanced courses in Italian literature and cultural studies. The focus of this course is to expose students to crucial issues that have influenced Italian culture and society, concurring to develop distinctive ways of thinking, cultural artifacts (literary works, music, works of art, and so on), and that are at the core of contemporary Italian society. Prerequisite: ITAL102 or placement.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B201 Italian Culture and Society

Language and Cultural Studies course with a strong cultural component. It focuses on the wide variety of problems that a post-industrial and mostly urban society like Italy must face today. Language structure and patterns will be reinforced through the study of music, short films, current issues, and even stereotypes. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or equivalent.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 0.5
Instructor(s): Perco,G.
(Fall 2012)

ITAL B203 Italian Theater (in Italian)

The course consists of a close reading in Italian of representative theatrical texts from the contemporary stage to the origins of Italian theater in the 16th century, including pieces by Dario Fo, Luigi Pirandello, Carlo Goldoni, the Commedia dell’arte and Niccolò Machiavelli. Attention will be paid to the development of language skills through reading out loud, performance, and discussion of both form and content, enhanced by the use of recordings and videos. Attention will also be paid to the development of critical and analytical writing skills through the writing of short reviews and the research and writing of a term paper.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B207 Dante in Translation

A reading of the Vita Nuova (Poems of Youth) and The Divine Comedy: Hell, Purgatory and Paradise in order to discover the subtle nuances of meaning in the text and to introduce students to Dante’s tripartite vision of the afterlife. Dante’s masterpiece lends itself to study from various perspectives: theological, philosophical, political, allegorical, historical, cultural, and literary. Personal journey, civic responsibilities, love, genre, governmental accountability, church-state relations, the tenuous balance between freedom of expression and censorship—these are some of the themes that will frame the discussions. Course taught in English; One additional hour for students who want Italian credit.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McAuliffe,D.
(Spring 2013)

ITAL B208 Petrarca and Boccaccio in Translation

The course will focus on a close analysis of Petrarch’s Canzoniere and Boccaccio’s Decameron, with attention given also to their minor works and the historical/literary context connected with these texts. Attention will also be given to Florentine literature, art, thought, and history from the death of Dante to the age of Lorenzo de’ Medici. Texts and topics available for study include the Trecento vernacular works of Petrarch and Boccaccio; and Florentine humanism from Salutati to Alberti. Course taught In English; one additional hour of target language instruction for students who want Italian credit.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McAuliffe,D.
(Fall 2012)

ITAL B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust, and Its Aftermath

A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to other Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Crosslisting(s): COML-B211; HEBR-B211
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice: Critical Discourses in the Humanities

An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Crosslisting(s): COML-B213; ENGL-B213; FREN-B213; GERM-B213; HART-B213; PHIL-B253; RUSS-B253
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B222 Focus: Reading Italian Literature in Italian I

The course will read major examples of the short story and novella through several centuries of Italian fiction, including texts written by women writers and immigrant writers. We will read novelle and short stories by Fogazzaro, D’Annunzio, Primo and Carlo Levi, Pasolini, Dacia Maraini, Antonio Tabucchi. This is a half semester Focus course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B223 Focus: Reading Italian Literature in Italian II

The course consists of a close reading in Italian of representative theatrical texts from the contemporary stage to the origins of Italian theater in the 16th century, including pieces by Dario Fo, Luigi Pirandello, Carlo Goldoni, the Commedia dell’arte and Niccolò Machiavelli. Attention will be paid to the development of language skills through reading out loud, performance, and discussion of both form and content, enhanced by the use of recordings and videos. Attention will also be paid to the development of critical and analytical writing skills through the writing of short reviews and the research and writing of a term paper. This is a half semester Focus course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B225 Italian Cinema and Literary Adaptation

The course will discuss how cinema conditions literary imagination and how literature leaves its imprint on cinema. We will “read” films as “literary images” and “see” novels as “visual stories.” The reading of Italian literary sources will be followed by evaluation of the corresponding films by well-known directors, including female directors. We will study, through close textual analysis, such issues as Fascism, nationhood, gender, sexuality, politics, regionalism, death, and family in the Italian context.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ricci,R.
(Spring 2013)

ITAL B235 The Italian Women’s Movement

Emphasis will be put on Italian women writers and film directors, who are often left out of syllabi adhering to traditional canons. Particular attention will be paid to: a) women writers who have found their voices (through writing) as a means of psychological survival in a patriarchal world; b) women engaged in the women’s movement of the 1970s and who continue to look at, and rewrite, women’s stories of empowerment and solidarity; c) “divaism”, fame, via beauty and sex with a particular emphasis on the ‘60s (i.e. Gina Lollobrigida, Sofia Loren, Claudia Cardinale). Counts toward the Gender and Sexuality Studies Concentration.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Film Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B255 Uomini d’onore in Sicilia:

This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, with reference also to Italian-American films, starting from the ‘classical’ example of Sicily. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative fiction, using Italian literature written by 19th, 20th, and 21st Italian Sicilian authors. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or permission of the instructor.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B299 Grief, Sexuality, Identity: Emerging Adulthood

Adolescence is an important time of personality development as a result of changes in the self-concept and the formation of a new moral system of values. Emphasis will be placed on issues confronting the role of the family and peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, youth criminality/gangsters/violence, cultural diversity, pregnancy, gender identity, mental/moral/religious development, emotional growth, alcoholism, homosexuality, sexual behavior. Prerequisite: ITAL 102.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B301 Dante

A reading of the Vita Nuova (Poems of Youth) and The Divine Comedy: Hell, Purgatory and Paradise in order to discover the subtle nuances of meaning in the text and to introduce students to Dante’s tripartite vision of the afterlife. Dante’s masterpiece lends itself to study from various perspectives: theological, philosophical, political, allegorical, historical, cultural, and literary. Personal journey, civic responsibilities, love, genre, governmental accountability, church-state relations, the tenuous balance between freedom of expression and censorship—these are some of the themes that will frame the discussions. Prerequisite: At least two literature courses (one at the 300 level). Taught in Italian.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B303 Petrarca and Boccaccio

The focus of the course is on The Decameron, one of the most entertaining, beloved and imitated prose works ever written. Like Dante’s Divine Comedy, this human comedy was written not only to delight, but also to instruct by exploring both our spiritual and our natural environment. The Decameron will be read in its entirety in Italian. Attention will also be paid to Petrarca’s Canzoniere, of which a small selection will be read in Italian. Topics will include how each author represented women in the context of 14th-century Italy. Prerequisite: two years of Italian and at least a 200-level course. Taught in Italian.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B304 Il Rinascimento in Italia e oltre

Students will become familiar with the growing importance of women during the Renaissance, as women expanded their sphere of activity in literature (as authors of epics, lyrics, treatises, and letters), in court (especially in Ferrara), and in society, where for the first time women formed groups and their own discourse. What happens when women become the subject of study? What is learned about women and the nation? What is learned about gender and how disciplinary knowledge itself is changed through the centuries? Prerequisite: At least one 200-level course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ricci,R.
(Spring 2013)

ITAL B307 Best of Italian Literature

This course focuses on the key role played by Italian culture in the development of the European civilization and Western literature. Many texts found their way to France, Spain, England where they were read, translated, disseminated. This process of assimilation influenced life, language, politics, and literature. The unique role played by Italian Renaissance on European civilization shines through contemporary best-sellers, The Da Vinci Code. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in Italian
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B310 Italian Popular Fiction

This course explores the Italian “giallo” (detective fiction), today one of the most successful literary genres among Italian readers and authors alike. Through a comparative perspective, the course will analyze not only the inter-relationship between this popular genre and “high literature,” but also the role of detective fiction as a mirror of social anxieties. Italian majors taking this course for Italian credit will be required to meet for an additional hour with the instructor and to do the readings and writing in Italian. Prerequisites: one literature course at the 200 level.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): COML-B310
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B322 Reading Italian Literature in Italian III

The focus of the course is on The Decameron, one of the most entertaining, beloved and imitated prose works ever written. Like Dante’s Divine Comedy, this human comedy was written not only to delight, but also to instruct by exploring both our spiritual and our natural environment. Prerequisite: two years of Italian and at least a 200-level course. Taught in Italian.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B323 Reading Italian Literature in Italian IV

Attention to Petrarca’s Canzoniere, of which a small selection will be read in Italian. Topics will include how the author represented women in the context of 14th-century Italy. Prerequisite: two years of Italian and at least a 200-level course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ITAL B380 Modernity and Psychoanalysis: Crossing National Boundaries in 20th c. Italy and Europe

Designed as an in-depth interdisciplinary exploration of Italy’s intellectual life, the course is organized around major literary and cultural trends in 20th century Europe, including philosophical ideas and cinema. We investigate Italian fiction in the global and international perspective, from modernity to Freud and Psychoanalysis, going beyond national boundaries and proposing ethical models across historical times. Prerequisites: One 200-Level course in Italian
-Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ricci,R.
(Fall 2012)

ITAL B398 Senior Seminar

This course is open only to senior Italian and Romance Languages majors. Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. By the end of the fall semester, students must have completed twenty pages in draft. See Thesis description.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ricci,R.
(Fall 2012)

ITAL B399 Senior Conference

This course is open only to senior Italian and Romance Languages majors. Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. In April there will be an oral defense with members and majors of the Italian Department. See Thesis description.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ricci,R.
(Spring 2013)

ITAL B403 Supervised Work

Offered with approval of the Department.
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2012, Spring 2013)